More terns and bits and bobs

Posted on - In Heysham Bird Observatory (LWT)
Bill Martin and myself covered the north wall this morning and similar fare to yesterday minus the oddities North wall 0650-0920Arctic Tern - 134 in (largest flock 21), a majority 0820-0910Sandwich Tern - c120 in, latterly a few bloggers - many fishing en route as they flew in but none seen to come out!Arctic Skua - dark morph chasing tern in the mouth of the bayGannet - 3/4cy in then outKittiwake - flock of 15 in (all but one 2CY)Guillemot - 1small waders - three flocks totalling 30Common Scoter - just one distant flock of c20Swallow - 11 inShag - 2CY on wooden jetty...

Back To Brown

Posted on - In Fleetwood Birder
It was a return to the brownfield site in the south of my region for me this morning, and what a glorious morning it was as I headed south down the M6 at 5:00 a.m. The weather was equally glorious at my survey site with clear skies and a light northeasterly breeze.I was keen to find out what was happening with the Little Ringed Plovers (LRP). I got out of my car and stood in front of a mound to give some background to my outline, and scanned with my scope. It seemed quiet at first and I thought "had they gone", but then I picked up one, then a second and then a third, and a breathed a sigh of relief. Little Ringed PloverI decided to change position to get the sun behind me and have a proper systematic look across the site. As I headed round to the other side to stand in front of a hedge, again to give some background to my outline, I c...
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Great earlyish morning by the seaside

Posted on - In Heysham Bird Observatory (LWT)
Wow this is such a late spring as north-easterlies produced what could be expected at the end of April/early May!   I gave up checking through the significant number of 2CY seagulls a week or so ago; Jean didn't this morning and out popped an Iceland Gull!   A singleton Black Tern joined the year list as it  motored into the Bay along the Kent channel line and a real bonus for the year list was a late passage Little Ringed Plover which flew in from the south, ran around for a bit on the 'mound' before heading off high to the north Sea 0740-0930 x 2 observersArctic Tern - 205 'in' (largest flock 29)Sandwich Tern - at least 49 inArctic Skua - perhaps the same light morph seen twice chasing terns at long rangeBlack Tern - singleton in on its own at 0817hrsRed-throated Diver - summer plumaged individual outIceland ...

A Packet Of Smarties

Posted on - In Another Bird Blog
I met up with Andy for our first Sand Martin ringing session of 2018. Like me, Andy had been on holiday, me in Menorca, and he in Turkey. Birders and ringers are ultra-competitive and as we swapped tales of sunny days his Eleonora’s Falcon was pretty good but I reckon I smashed him with 5 Golden Orioles, a European Roller and a Red-footed Falcon. There was no such exotica today. It was back to the bread and butter of Cockerham, the piping of Oystercatchers and the steady buzz of Sand Martins all around us as we waited to catch. Last year was very poor for our catches here as the so-called summer kept thwarting our planned visits. This year the colony is more tightly packed and so far at least, the weather is much better. We counted 200+ Sand Martins in attendance with most of the occupied nests in the softer strata layer of the...
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Volunteer Coordinator (Lets Grow Preston)

Posted on - In Lancashire Wildlife Trust
Quick summary:  We are looking for an enthusiastic and experienced Part Time Project Officer to work with volunteers, trainees and community groups to deliver a range of activities and training sessions in Preston in partnership with Lets Grow Preston. Part Time – 18.75 hours per week This post is offered on a fixed-term basis until 28th February 2021                                                                                             Salary:  £22,152.00 per annum pro rata ...

A Day In The Life Of….

Posted on - In Birds2blog
....well, only five hours on Monday actually.The Goosander. It was good that I finally caught up with the female Goosander with her 4 ducklings in the creeks at Conder Green, along with a female Mallard and her 5. A combined total of 9 ducklings from an absolute minimum of 17 between these two birds, an amazing 26 if they both had full broods which they probably rarely do, either way, some serious losses here then, 8 minimum loss, 17 maximum loss. I've so far found no breeding records of the Goosander anywhere near this area....a first. The pair of Common Tern and the Oystercatcher were loafing around - sitting on eggs in the case of the females - on the Conder Pool pontoon, appearing to totally ignore each other barely a half metre apart, also, 17 Tufted Duck, and 5 Greylag noted. A circuit produced, Hous...

The dreaded ‘meagre fare’ should read ‘didnt get up early enough’

Posted on - In Heysham Bird Observatory (LWT)
Very quick post - pics will be added tomorrow Janet & Malcolm for last two daysMore serious heat haze trouble with a large brownish object seemingly diving into the outer Leven estuary but to be honest it could even have been a bouncy castle.  Ospreys are known to be in the area!Common or Arctic Tern - 4 feeding in riffle, then in; almost certainly Arctic but a long way offSandwich T|ern - 2 dittoCetti's Warbler - two singing males central marshLittle Grebe - welcome breeding pair on no swimming pond...

First Numbers Of Swifts

Posted on - In Fleetwood Birder
Certain species have been giving birders cause for concern this Spring with their lack of numbers and/or lateness of arrival, and Swift is one of them. Others include Swallow, House Martin, Sand Martin, Whitethroat and Reed Warbler. What the Hirundines and the Swift have in common is that they are aerial feeders and need flying insects during their migration back from Africa to sustain them.This morning I was doing the second of a Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) in north Lancs and I had a few Swifts, thirteen in fact. And this is by far my largest count this Spring.I also had a few House Martins, nine, and four Swallows. Just a single Whitethroat, one of the other missing species, and a single Chiffchaff took care of the Warblers. Best of the rst included a Great Spotted Woodpecker, a singing Song Thrush, four Mistle Thrushes, a Kestrel, four La...

Comment on Silent spring? Saorsa, Finn and Blue all suddenly disappear

The plight of our hen harriers is a national disgrace. The relentless persecution will not end until driven grouse shooting is consigned to the dustbin of history where it belongs. Then we can start to rebuild the shattered ecology of our uplands, and our national Parks and Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty can become what they were intended to be. ...

The River Darwen

Posted on - In Ribble Rivers Trust
The River Darwen begins on the South Pennine Moors. It then flows through a valley of Carboniferous rocks, including limestone, Millstone Grit, shales and coal, to meet the River Ribble in Preston. The River Darwen has one of the most impressive gorges in Lancashire, known as Hoghton Bottoms. The bedrock is largely covered by glacial and post-glacial deposits of sands, gravels, clays and alluvium. Where the bedrock is exposed at the surface, there is a Continue Reading... The post The River Darwen appeared first on Ribble Rivers Trust. ...
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